david

lloyd-hoare

MBACP (Accredited)

Bsc(Hons)

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Motivation or Confusion

Pure, unadulterated motivation is rare (most of the time); you just have to keep plugging away.


If necessary, pause every now and then to remind yourself why you have chosen to take on certain work, what you expect to get out of it. Give yourself a pep talk.


When you've done something you feel good about, reward yourself with a treat: you deserve it!


Completed tasks keep interest and motivation at a higher level. Complete a task, accomplish a sub-goal, before you quit for the day.

Some Motivational Quotes


WHEN A DREAM takes hold of you, what can you do? You can run with it, let it run your life, or let it go and think for the rest of your life about what might have been.


PATCH ADAMS



IF YOU PREPARE yourself  at every point as well as you can, with whatever means you have . . . you will be able to grasp opportunity for broader experience when it appears. Without preparation, you cannot do it.


ELEANOR ROOSEVELT (1884-1962)

U.S. First Lady and humanitarian


TO DREAM ANYTHING that you want to dream, that is the beauty of the human mind. To do anything you want to do. that is the strength of the human will. To trust yourself to test your limits, that is the courage to succeed.


BERNARD EDMONDS


THERE IS ONLY ONE CORNER of the universe you can be certain of improving, and that is your own self. So you have to begin there, not outside, not on other people. That comes afterwards, when you have worked on your own corner.


ALDOUS HUXLEY (1894-1963)

Writer


FIRST say to yourself what you would be. And then do what you have to do.


EPICTETUS (C. 55-135 A.D.)

Philosopher


IF YOU ALWAYS do what you've always done, you'll always get what you've always got.


TOO MANY OF US are hung up on what we don't have, can't have, or won't ever have. We spend too much energy being down, when we could use that same energy, if not less of it, doing, or at least trying to do, some of the things we really want to do.


TERRY MCMILLAN

Writer


WHEN YOU ARE INSPIRED by some great purpose, some extraordinary project, all your thoughts break their bounds: Your mind transcends limitations, your consciousness expands in every direction, and you find yourself in a new, great, and wonderful world. Dormant forces, faculties, and talents become alive, and you discover yourself to be a greater person by far than you ever dreamed yourself to be.


PATANJALI (SECOND CENTURY B.C.)

Philosopher


YOU CAN TRULY be whatever you want to be . . . you only have to want it badly enough to succeed.


LILLIAN VERNON

President, Lillian Vernon Corporation

cited in Target Marketing magazine


YOUR VISION will become clear only when you can look into your own heart.


CARL JUNG (1875-1961)

Psychiatrist


LIVE YOUR LIFE each day as you would climb a mountain. An occasional glance toward the summit keeps the goal in mind, but many beautiful scenes are to be observed from each new vantage point. Climb slowly, steadily, enjoying each passing moment. The view from the summit will serve as a fitting climax for the journey.


HAROLD V. MELCHERT


YOU CAN HAVE anything you want if you want it desperately enough. You must want it with an inner exuberance that erupts through the skin and joins the energy that created the world.

 


SHEILAH GRAHAM

Journalist


HOW EXTRAORDINARY people are, that they get themselves into such situations where they go on doing what they dislike doing, and have no need or obligation to do, simply because it seems to be expected.


Margaret Drabble

Act Enthusiastic!


The great accomplishments of man have resulted from the transmission of ideas and enthusiasm," Thomas J. Watson, IBM founder, once observed. Don't you feel great on days when you're filled with enthusiasm and brimming with ideas? Wouldn't it be terrific if you could feel like that most of the time instead of occasionally?


When you act with enthusiasm not only do you feel great, but the feeling rubs off on everyone around you. So with that in mind, here are some ways to generate enthusiasm—both in yourself and in your coworkers:


• Think positive thoughts. Think about the day you have in front of you as you're getting dressed or commuting. Picture doing what you like to do best, whether it's working on certain projects, meeting with certain people, or perhaps it's just a lunch date you've been looking forward to. Imagining yourself doing agreeable things during the day will help put you in a good mood at the day's start.


• Welcome challenges. If you know that the day you have in front of you is going to be a trying one, build your confidence by replaying some of your successes. How did you feel? What did you do? What did you say? This mental preparation will help you stand up to the challenge and make it easier for you to be positive and enthusiastic.


• Make yourself lively and interesting. Put excitement in your voice! When you greet your coworkers in the morning, speak a little louder than you usually do. Instead of mumbling a muffled "good morning" as you shuffle to get your coffee, stop, look the other person in the eye, and say with a smile, "Hey Joe, nice to see you. Great morning, isn't it?" Joe will probably wonder what's gotten into you, but he'll probably smile and respond in kind—which brings us to our next point . . .


• Make people smile. When you walk into someone's office or work area with a big smile on your face, the other person smiles back. They can't help it: A smile is contagious. So try this: All day today, every time you have to ask someone a question, just walk into their space and stand there smiling for a few seconds. Then ask your question and see what kind of response you get.


• Look the part. Put bounce in your step and a gleam in your eye. Sit erect in your chair as you work. Whistle while you walk through the hallways (but not so loudly that it disturbs your coworkers). When people are enthusiastic about something, they feel and look happy. Let your enthusiasm show.


• Share your positive emotions. When you feel good about something or someone, let it out. For example, you might greet your coworker on Monday morning by sharing something like, "I'm really enjoying working on this project with you, Sue. I'm learning a lot from you. I think our boss is going to be pleased with the results, too." Sharing positive sentiments makes two people happy: you and the person you share with.


Take the first steps toward cultivating an enthusiastic attitude now. Act enthusiastic and soon you won't have to act anymore. You'll become enthusiastic, and so will everyone you come in contact with.

Principles of Success

These rules apply no matter if you want to succeed in the classroom, in the boardroom, on the playing field, on stage, or any other place . . .


1. Show up.

2. Pay attention.

3. Ask questions.

4. Get help before you really need it.

5. Willingly help others.

6. "I can't" is not synonymous with "I don't want to."

7. You don't have to "like" a task to excel at it.

8. Curiosity always beats intelligence.

9. The problem isn't the problem. How you handle the problem, that's the problem.

Pulling Your Own Strings

IT'S VERY EASY in life to become a skilled marionette dancer. Early on, most people are told who they are and how they should live their lives. With each move they are told to make, another string is lifted. Many people go their whole lives never really making a move of their own. They do the marionette dance for other people's pleasure, and their whole lives are a show.


Some people tire of doing this dance and go off, backstage, to do a dance of their own. They may look awkwardly un-choreographed, but they are moving their limbs of their own accord and are dancing to a music all their own, to their own inner harmony of soul.


While it is easy and comfortable to let others pull the strings for you, there is an inner satisfaction that comes from doing it yourself, a freedom of movement and acknowledgment of your own powers that those who remain marionette dancers their whole lives never know.


SUNITA SINGHI


A Parable: A little boy and girl wanted to meet the wisest man in the world. When they found him, they said, “Sir, we understand you are one of the wisest men in the world. We want to be like you when we grow up. How can we do that?”


The man responded with these words of wisdom: “Children, there are four words I would like to say to you. When you grow up, you will be very wise if you remember these words and live by them.


“The first word is Think. Think about the values and principles that are important to you.


“The second word is Believe. Believe in yourself based on the thinking you have done.


“The third word is Dream. Dream about what you want to become, based on your belief in yourself.


“And the last word is Dare. Dare to make your dream a reality.”


Then, in front of Sleeping Beauty’s castle by Snow White’s wishing well, Walt Disney said to the boy and girl, “Let me say those four words again, so you can remember them: Think, Believe, Dream, and Dare.”

Lack of motivation is usually a symptom of other underlying problems. We all need “a reason to get out of bed in the morning”. We are all unique and individual, with differing backgrounds and life experiences, and it is not possible within the scope of this web site to identify for each different person the cause(s) of their lack of motivation. Click on the links below to read about some of the possible causes.


Depression   Loneliness   Low Self-esteem   Relationship Problems   

Family Problems   Stress   Bereavement   Alcohol Problems   Drug Problems


You may also find something helpful on this page, otherwise consulting a qualified counsellor could allow you to explore the aspects of your life which you may need to change to find the fulfilment you deserve.

About Yourself

Who you are is more valuable than what you do. Your worth as a person is not based on your intelligence, your grades, how hard you work. It is enough to be you.


Respect and value the opinions of others - but realize that ultimately you must respect and satisfy yourself.


Practice impulse control by imagining the consequences of your actions. How will you feel afterwards? Then, act so that you will be satisfied with yourself.


Write out a plan for yourself. Jot down personal and academic goals and priorities, and re-read them when you're in a slump.


Don't worry about or dwell on things that go wrong. Concentrate on your successes. Remember that little successes build up just as quickly as little failures.


Give yourself time to change. Forgive yourself for backsliding and making mistakes.


Don't be a perfectionist. Be good enough. Make approaching your goals the basis of your self-respect rather than reaching your goals.


Don't allow feelings of inadequacy to get you down. Everybody else has these, similar or other feelings of inadequacy. Think about all the things you do have going for you.


If you're feeling down or hopeless, imagine the worst that could happen, exaggerate your fantasies, and then laugh at them. Do this to put yourself and your current situation in perspective.


When you're down, go to someone whom you know cares for you and ask him or her to give you a "pep talk," reminding you of your good qualities and talents and abilities and/or make a list of your good qualities and read them when you need to.


Be willing to risk failure for something you really care about. Be willing to risk success, too!


If you're irrationally afraid of something, do it a lot; the fear will wear off.


Learn to recognise, sooner, events which are not turning out as they should, and act to redirect them to your satisfaction.

About Your Work

No one else is forcing you to do your work. You've decided to take it on. Don't waste your energy in hostility toward others. Accept and live with your own decisions or change your situation


Start early. The sooner you start, the sooner you'll be free to do other activities, the less worry you'll experience, the more time you'll have to recover from mistakes and wrong directions.


Expect a certain amount of tension. Use that tension as energy to get yourself moving.


Different people have different styles of working. For example, some people need competition to do their best, while others work better at their own pace. Respect your work style and arrange the conditions you need to do well.


If you have a long, hard task, make it as comfortable for you as possible. Do it in short bits (but stay with it), do it wearing comfortable clothes, among friends, in familiar surroundings, with whatever you need to keep your spirits up while you work at it.

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